nesting * geeking * critiquing

Man of Steel—Revisited

After a second screening for Man of Steel last night, I wanted to supplement my original review.

This time around, I got to see the film in 3D. While there aren’t any eye-popping effects (it was post-converted, not filmed in 3D), the overall quality did seem significantly better. I’m not sure if I should attribute this more to the format or the venue, as our second viewing was at Alamo Drafthouse in Kansas City. In spite of the dine-in theater distractions, Alamo provided a much more immersive experience than AMC’s 2D presentation. If you value a movie with booming sound that is effective rather than just loud—and you’re near one of the few locations—I highly suggest you make Alamo Drafthouse Cinema your theater of choice. Bonus: the modified 3D format also alleviated much of the dreaded lens flare.

The combined presentation and my somewhat dulled expectations made the second viewing an absolute joy!
I stand by my original criticisms but feel this flick deserves a more positive spin than what I offered. It leaves a better aftertaste than the bitterness that I first implied.

I remain disappointed by the opening Krypton scenes, though I wasn’t nearly as perturbed this time around. My biggest complaint is that it just reminds me too much of a Star Wars prequel. And I’m a Star Wars girl, so you’d think that would be a good thing but it really isn’t so much.

I also maintain that the flashbacks are somewhat disjointed, though they aren’t terribly detrimental to the overall pace or storyline. This is due in large part to the strong performances by Costner, Lane and Cavill (and the brilliant young actors who represented his early years). For a film about a man who can fly, this is solidly grounded with a big, big heart. And again, our midwest audience was giddy over the Royals and KU references—that in itself is pretty darn cool and worth the price of admission in these parts. And in case I didn’t mention it before, Henry Cavill is absolutely 100% without-a-doubt perfectly cast.

A second chance for Amy Adams yields no more likability than my first impression, though I found Michael Shannon’s General Zod and Russell Crowe’s Jor-El more compelling. I can also report that after a few days mulling over the Zimmer score, I don’t hate it. Still feels an awful lot like that of Inception, and I would have loved even the slightest nod to the original theme, but it grows on you.

I may have been too quick to pit Man of Steel against the cinema-giants of Marvel. They’re very different animals, really. Though DC and Warner Brothers lost ground over the last twenty or so years with their failed recasting and attempted reboots of both Superman and Batman franchises (and we won’t even discuss Catwoman), they’re fighting their way back into the game. These are particularly timeless characters that need the right stories and the right actors—in many respects, Man of Steel answers the call almost as well as did the Dark Knight saga. Almost.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I can’t guarantee that you’ll enjoy the film, but I certainly did. Even more so the second time around, in fact, so I’m already planning to see it at least once more!

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